Chapter 37 is the second of four chapters called the “historical chapters” that describe a series of events that occurred during the lifetime of Isaiah. These events are important for us in the latter days because they serve as prophetic types for events that will occur in our own time.1

These events were the subject of prophecy earlier in Isaiah’s writings.2 However, the ancient fulfillment of these prophecies as described in these chapters is not the full story. The Assyrian aggressors are typical of an equivalent superpower in the latter days that will threaten the Lord’s people and, just as He defended Hezekiah and his people anciently, the Lord will defend His righteous people in the latter days.3 Details pertaining to the dual fulfillment of this prophecy are provided here in Chapter 37.

The events of Isaiah Chapter 37 are also recorded in 2 Kings Chapter 19. A careful comparison reveals that differences in wording between the two accounts occur in nearly every verse without significantly altering the meaning.4

Major events of Chapter 37, continuing the account of the previous chapter, are as follows: Hezekiah, upon hearing the report of Eliakim and his companions, tears his clothing in dismay. Hezekiah then sends Eliakim and others to the prophet Isaiah, seeking counsel. Isaiah prophesies the defeat of the Assyrians and the death of Sennacherib. Sennacherib sends Hezekiah a blasphemous letter, and Hezekiah prays unto the Lord for deliverance. The Lord speaks again to Isaiah, foretelling the defense of Jerusalem against Sennacherib and, later, the captivity and return of the Jews. Finally, the angel of the Lord slays 185,000 of the Assyrian army and Sennacherib is slain in his own land by his sons.

Abundant chiasms in this chapter reinforce the argument that Isaiah himself wrote this and the other “historical chapters,” since this important aspect of Isaiah’s writing style is maintained.

Verse 1 continues the narrative from the previous chapter, describing Hezekiah’s response to the report brought by Eliakim and two companions: “And it came to pass, when king Hezekiah heard it, that he rent his clothes, and covered himself with sackcloth, and went into the house of the LORD.” The report causes great distress for Hezekiah. Rending of his clothing is an outward expression of his anguish, and his putting on clothing made of sackcloth indicates that he went to the temple fasting. Sackcloth was made of coarse goat’s hair or camel’s hair and was typically used for making cloth bags.5

Verse 2 states: “And he sent Eliakim, who was over the household, and Shebna the scribe, and the elders of the priests covered with sackcloth, unto Isaiah the prophet the son of Amoz.” Note that the recorder, Joah Asaph’s son who was present with Eliakim and Shebna during Rab-shakeh’s pronouncements in Chapter 36, was not sent to Isaiah. Instead, certain “elders of the priests” were sent.

Verse 3 begins the messengers’ declaration to Isaiah: “And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and of blasphemy: for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.” The people were in great anguish because of the blasphemy and threat of war delivered by Rab-shakeh. Doubtless, they also recalled the desolation of the northern kingdom of Israel following their being conquered and carried away by the Assyrians. The metaphor used in this verse describes great distress. Before development of techniques of modern medicine an expectant mother in the throes of labor but lacking the strength to deliver would perish, causing indescribable anguish to her family due to her loss and the loss of her child.

Verses 1 through 3 contain a chiasm:

A: (1) And it came to pass, when king Hezekiah heard it, that he rent his clothes,
B: and covered himself with sackcloth,
C: and went into the house of the LORD.
D: (2) And he sent Eliakim,
C: who was over the household,
B: and Shebna the scribe, and the elders of the priests covered with sackcloth, unto Isaiah the prophet the son of Amoz.
A: (3) And they said unto him, Thus saith Hezekiah, This day is a day of trouble, and of rebuke, and of blasphemy: for the children are come to the birth, and there is not strength to bring forth.

The chiasm tells the story in poetic form: Hezekiah puts on sackcloth and goes to the house of the Lord. He sends Eliakim and Shebna, also clothed in sackcloth, to Isaiah to seek the Lord’s counsel.

In verse 4, the messengers to Isaiah state their errand: “It may be the LORD thy God will hear the words of Rab-shakeh, whom the king of Assyria his master hath sent to reproach the living God, and will reprove the words which the LORD thy God hath heard: wherefore lift up thy prayer for the remnant that is left.” The Great Isaiah Scroll states “the remnant that remain in this city.”6 The Assyrian army had devastated the whole of Judah except for the capital city, Jerusalem; many people had been slain or taken captive, and some had fled into the city ahead of the marauders. The hope expressed by the messengers is that the Lord, having heard Rab-shakeh’s blasphemy before God, will punish him and save Judah from destruction. They request that Isaiah pray in behalf of the Jews.

Verse 4 contains a chiasm:

A: (4) It may be the LORD thy God
B: will hear the words
C: of Rab-shakeh,
C: whom the king of Assyria his master hath sent to reproach the living God,
B: and will reprove the words
A: which the LORD thy God hath heard: wherefore lift up thy prayer for the remnant that is left.

This chiasm expresses the hope that the Lord will be angered by the blasphemous words of Rab-shakeh and will defend Judah. “Rab-shakeh” complements “to reproach the living God,” a declaration that Rab-shakeh himself was a reproach.

Verse 5 summarizes: “So the servants of king Hezekiah came to Isaiah.”

Verses 6 and 7 deliver Isaiah’s comforting response. Verse 6 begins: “And Isaiah said unto them, Thus shall ye say unto your master, Thus saith the LORD, Be not afraid of the words that thou hast heard, wherewith the servants of the king of Assyria have blasphemed me.”

Verses 4 through 6 contain two overlapping chiasms which, in turn, partially overlap that of verse 4:

(4) It may be the LORD thy God will hear the words of Rab-shakeh,
A: whom the king of Assyria his master hath sent to reproach the living God,
B: and will reprove the words
C: which the LORD thy God hath heard: wherefore lift up thy prayer for the remnant that is left.
D: (5) So the servants of king Hezekiah
E:   came to Isaiah.
E:   (6) And Isaiah said unto them,
D: Thus shall ye say unto your master,
C: Thus saith the LORD,
B: Be not afraid of the words that thou hast heard,
A: wherewith the servants of the king of Assyria have blasphemed me.

The ascending side of the chiasm presents the plea from the servants of Hezekiah to Isaiah, whereas the descending side begins the Lord’s answer given through the prophet.

The overlapping chiasm contained in these same two verses provides additional interpretive links:

(4) It may be the LORD thy God will hear the words of Rab-shakeh,
A: whom the king of Assyria his master hath sent to reproach the living God, and will reprove the words which the LORD thy God hath heard: wherefore lift up thy prayer for the remnant that is left.
B: (5) So the servants of king Hezekiah came to Isaiah.
C: (6) And Isaiah said unto them, Thus shall ye say unto your master,
C: Thus saith the LORD, Be not afraid of the words that thou hast heard,
B: wherewith the servants of the king of Assyria
A: have blasphemed me.

The first chiasm focuses on two iterations of “Isaiah,” and “king Hezekiah” equates with “your master.” In the overlapping chiasm “servants of king Hezekiah” contrasts with “servants of the king of Assyria;” and “thus shall ye say to your master” compares with “thus saith the Lord.” In both chiasms, “reproach the living God” matches “blasphemed me.” Because of the overlapping chiasms, all the occurrences of “the LORD” in verses 4 through 6 are structurally equivalent.

Verse 7 continues the words of the Lord, spoken by Isaiah: “Behold, I will send a blast upon him, and he shall hear a rumour, and return to his own land; and I will cause him to fall by the sword in his own land.” “Blast” means “spirit,” “wind” or “hard breathing through the nostrils in anger.”7

Isaiah’s prophecy concerning Sennacherib, the king of Assyria, contains three parts: First, the Lord’s anger, or curse, will be sent upon him; second, he will hear a rumor that will prompt him to return home; and third, he will be slain by the sword in his own land.

In verse 8, upon his return the Assyrian captain finds changed circumstances: “So Rab-shakeh returned, and found the king of Assyria warring against Libnah: for he had heard that he was departed from Lachish.” Sennacherib heard that an adversary, Libnah, had left the city of Lachish; thus Sennacherib had pursued him to continue the conflict.

Verse 9 provides details explaining why Sennacherib was not able to go immediately to Jerusalem to commence military operations there: “And he heard say concerning Tirhakah king of Ethiopia, he is come forth to make war with thee. And when he heard it, he sent messengers to Hezekiah.” The Great Isaiah Scroll states “he returned and sent messengers to Hezekiah….”8 Sennacherib’s purpose was to promote further developments at Jerusalem in order to end the confrontation with Hezekiah, thus avoiding war on two fronts. We learn later, in verse 14, that the message was in the form of one or more letters, carried by the messengers, to Hezekiah.

Verses 10 through 13 contain the text of the letters. Verse 10 commences with instructions to the messengers: “Thus shall ye speak to Hezekiah king of Judah, saying, Let not thy God, in whom thou trustest, deceive thee, saying, Jerusalem shall not be given into the hand of the king of Assyria.” Sennacherib’s use of negative phrases may obscure the meaning of this passage. The first states: “Let not thy God, in whom thou trustest, deceive thee….” This means, in essence, “Don’t listen to what you think your God may be telling you.” The second phrase offers Sennacherib’s assumption of what God would tell Hezekiah: “Jerusalem shall not be given into the hand of the king of Assyria.” Although this was ultimately proven to be a true statement, Sennacherib wishes to communicate the opposite meaning—that not even Israel’s God could protect Jerusalem from the advance of the Assyrians.

Verse 10 contains a chiasm:

A: (10) Thus shall ye speak to Hezekiah king of Judah,
B: saying, Let not thy God,
C: in whom thou
D: trustest,
D: deceive
C: thee,
B: saying, Jerusalem shall not be given
A: into the hand of the king of Assyria.

This chiasm illustrates that Sennacherib’s intent was to intimidate; Hezekiah’s was to trust in the Lord.

Verses 11 through 13 continue the letter:

Behold, thou hast heard what the kings of Assyria have done to all lands by destroying them utterly; and shalt thou be delivered?
Have the gods of the nations delivered them which my fathers have destroyed, as Gozan, and Haran, and Rezeph, and the children of Eden which were in Telassar?
Where is the king of Hamath, and the king of Arphad, and the king of the city of Sepharvaim, Hena, and Ivah?

The Great Isaiah Scroll adds and Samaria to Sennacherib’s list.9 The Assyrian king asks a series of rhetorical questions in which he asserts his intent and capacity to destroy Jerusalem, just as he and his predecessors had overcome king after king and destroyed kingdom upon kingdom.

Verse 14 describes Hezekiah’s reaction: “And Hezekiah received the letter from the hand of the messengers, and read it: and Hezekiah went up unto the house of the LORD, and spread it before the LORD.” The Great Isaiah Scroll pluralizes, stating “received the letters” and “read them.”10

Verse 15 declares: “And Hezekiah prayed unto the LORD, saying—”

In verse 16, Hezekiah’s prayer begins, continuing the sentence of verse 15: “O LORD of hosts, God of Israel, that dwellest between the cherubims, thou art the God, even thou alone, of all the kingdoms of the earth: thou hast made heaven and earth.” The phrase “that dwellest between the cherubims” refers to the altar in the holy of holies in the temple. The Lord, speaking to Moses, explained the meaning:

And there I will meet with thee, and I will commune with thee from above the mercy seat, from between the two cherubims which are upon the ark of the testimony, of all things which I will give thee in commandment unto the children of Israel.11

The sacred altar was the place designated for prophets—and a righteous king in this case—to receive revelation from the Lord. Hezekiah acknowledges that the Lord is the one true and living God, creator of heaven and earth.

Hezekiah’s prayer continues in verse 17: “Incline thine ear, O LORD, and hear; open thine eyes, O LORD, and see: and hear all the words of Sennacherib, which hath sent to reproach the living God.” The original Hebrew meaning is “…to blaspheme the living God.”12

In verses 18 and 19 Hezekiah acknowledges the truth of part of Sennacherib’s words: “Of a truth, LORD, the kings of Assyria have laid waste all the nations, and their countries, And have cast their gods into the fire: for they were no gods, but the work of men’s hands, wood and stone: therefore they have destroyed them.”

In verse 20, Hezekiah concludes his prayer with a plea for deliverance: “Now therefore, O LORD our God, save us from his hand, that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that thou art the LORD, even thou only.” The Great Isaiah Scroll adds “even thou only art God.”13 By the Lord delivering the Jews from the Assyrian army, the whole world would see that Israel’s God is the only true God.

Verses 16 through 20, comprising Hezekiah’s prayer, contain a chiasm:

A: (16) O LORD of hosts, God of Israel, that dwellest between the cherubims,
B: thou art the God, even thou alone,
C: of all the kingdoms of the earth:
D: thou hast made heaven and earth.
E: 17) Incline thine ear, O LORD, and hear;
E: open thine eyes, O LORD, and see: and hear all the words of Sennacherib, which hath sent to blaspheme the living God.
D: (18) Of a truth, LORD, the kings of Assyria have laid waste
C: all the nations, and their countries,
B: (19) And have cast their gods into the fire: for they were no gods, but the works of men’s hands, wood and stone: therefore they have destroyed them.
A: (20) Now therefore, O LORD our God, save us from his hand, that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that thou art the LORD, even thou only.

“Thou art the God …” contrasts with “they were no gods,” exhibiting the fallacy of Sennacherib’s logic. The Lord is the creator of all, in contrast to the powerless idols of other nations, made by human hands. “Made heaven and earth” contrasts with “laid waste,” setting the powers of creation in opposition to the powers of destruction and chaos.

The Lord’s answer to Hezekiah’s prayer is given in verses 21 through 35. Verse 21 commences: “Then Isaiah the son of Amoz sent unto Hezekiah, saying, Thus saith the LORD God of Israel, Whereas thou hast prayed to me against Sennacherib king of Assyria—” The Great Isaiah Scroll adds “Thus saith the LORD God of Israel, to whom thou hast prayed….”14 Isaiah sent a message to the king, rather than appearing in person.

In verse 22 Isaiah proclaims the word of the Lord, first speaking against Sennacherib: “This is the word which the LORD hath spoken concerning him; The virgin, the daughter of Zion, hath despised thee, and laughed thee to scorn; the daughter of Jerusalem hath shaken her head at thee.” The phrase “the virgin, the daughter of Zion” is chiastically equivalent to “the daughter of Jerusalem;” as used here, it means the city of Jerusalem.15 Equivalency of “daughter of Zion” and “daughter of Jerusalem” reflects the dual nature of the prophecy and its fulfillment in two different periods of history. Compare Isaiah’s earlier prophecy regarding these events: “As yet shall he [the king of Assyria] remain at Nob that day: he shall shake his hand against the mount of the daughter of Zion, the hill of Jerusalem.”16

Also, compare the range of meaning in the chiastic couplet “for out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.”17 The Lord defended Jerusalem at the time of Hezekiah and will defend Zion in the latter days, both in a similar manner and both in fulfillment of this prophecy.

In verse 23, the Lord poses and then answers rhetorical questions: “Whom hast thou reproached and blasphemed? and against whom hast thou exalted thy voice, and lifted up thine eyes on high? Even against the Holy One of Israel.” The king of Assyria’s blasphemy is against the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel.

Verses 21 through 23 contain a chiasm:

(21) Then Isaiah the son of Amoz sent unto Hezekiah, saying,
A: Thus saith the LORD God of Israel,
B: Whereas thou hast prayed
C: to me
D: against Sennacherib king of Assyria:
E: (22) This is the word which the LORD hath spoken concerning him;
F: The virgin, the daughter of Zion,
G: hath despised
H: thee,
H: and laughed thee
G: to scorn;
F: the daughter of Jerusalem hath shaken her head at thee.
E: (23) Whom hast thou reproached and blasphemed?
D: and against
C: whom
B: hast thou exalted thy voice, and lifted up thine eyes on high?
A: even against the Holy One of Israel.

This chiasm delivers the words of the Lord to Hezekiah, given through the prophet Isaiah. “The LORD God of Israel” is equivalent to “the Holy One of Israel.” “Daughter of Zion” and “daughter of Jerusalem” are equivalent; their equivalency strengthens the thesis that this prophecy is to be fulfilled at two different times. The Lord defended Jerusalem at the time of Hezekiah and will defend Zion in the latter days, both in a similar manner and both in fulfillment of this prophecy.

Verse 24 continues the Lord’s accusation: “By thy servants hast thou reproached the Lord, and hast said, By the multitude of my chariots am I come up to the height of the mountains, to the sides of Lebanon; and I will cut down the tall cedars thereof, and the choice fir trees thereof: and I will enter into the height of his border, and the forest of his Carmel.” The metaphor of trees as noblemen is used throughout Isaiah’s writings.18

These words, spoken to the ancient king of Assyria, serve as a prophetic type for events in the latter days. A modern equivalent superpower will threaten the latter-day Zion after having devastated the surrounding regions.

The metaphor of trees was set forth earlier by Isaiah, first providing the interpretation:

For the day of the LORD of hosts shall be upon every one that is proud and lofty, and upon every one that is lifted up; and he shall be brought low:
And upon all the cedars of Lebanon, that are high and lifted up, and upon all the oaks of Bashan….19

The phrase “the height of the mountains” in verse 24 provides a link to latter-day events. A variation of this phrase was used earlier by Isaiah:

And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the LORD’s house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it (emphasis added).20

Isaiah spoke of the modern state of Utah, the name of which means “the top of the mountains” in the Ute language,21 where a temple would be built.

Verses 23 and 24 contain a chiasm:

A: (23) Whom
B: hast thou reproached and blasphemed?
C: and against whom
D: hast thou exalted thy voice,
D: and lifted up thine eyes on high?
C: even against the Holy One of Israel.
B: (24) By thy servants hast thou reproached
A: the Lord, and hast said….

“Whom” matches “the Lord;” “against whom” matches “the Holy one of Israel,” and “exalted thy voice” matches “lifted up thine eyes on high.” The Lord takes affront at the blasphemous words of Sennacherib.

In verse 25 Isaiah describes boasting by the king of Assyria: “I have digged, and drunk water; and with the sole of my feet have I dried up all the rivers of the besieged places.”22 The Great Isaiah Scroll reads “and drunk foreign water,”23 meaning water in foreign nations. The ancient Assyrians were able to traverse vast desert regions by digging wells wherever they went rather than relying upon existing streams and springs, thus increasing the range of their conquests.

In verse 26, the Lord rebukes Sennacherib for his boasting: “Hast thou not heard long ago, how I have done it; and of ancient times, that I have formed it? now have I brought it to pass, that thou shouldest be to lay waste defenced cities into ruinous heaps.” The Lord, by using negative rhetorical questions, shows that the Assyrian king already knows of the Lord’s power to act and to create and that He has raised him up to destroy cities.

In verse 27 the Lord belittles the conquests of the king of Assyria: “Therefore their inhabitants were of small power, they were dismayed and confounded: they were as the grass of the field, and as the green herb, as the grass on the housetops, and as corn blasted before it be grown up.” The Great Isaiah Scroll reads “…blasted before an east wind.”24  The Lord explains that these were weak kingdoms of little consequence, who were easily frightened and dismayed. “Blasted” refers to any of a number of crop-destroying diseases that result in drying up of plants before they achieve maturity, in addition to the Great Isaiah Scroll’s meaning of desiccation before a hot, drying wind.

Verse 28 reveals the Lord’s knowledge of the Assyrian king’s malevolence: “But I know thy abode, and thy going out, and thy coming in, and thy rage against me.” In place of “abode,” the Great Isaiah Scroll reads “I know thy rising up….”25

In verse 29, the Lord foretells the king’s departure in defeat: “Because thy rage against me, and thy tumult, is come up into mine ears, therefore will I put my hook in thy nose, and my bridle in thy lips, and I will turn thee back by the way by which thou camest.” “My hook in thy nose” and “my bridle in thy lips” refer to devices for controlling animals by inflicting pain or directing their view, here used metaphorically.

Verses 26 through 29 contain a chiasm:

A: (26) Hast thou not heard long ago, how I have done it;
B: and of ancient times, that I have formed it?
C: now have I brought it to pass,
D: that thou shouldest be to lay waste defenced cities into ruinous heaps.
E: (27) Therefore their inhabitants were of small power,
F: they were dismayed
F: and confounded:
E: they were as the grass of the field, and as the green herb, as the grass on the housetops, and as corn blasted before it be grown up.
D: (28) But I know thy abode, and thy going out, and thy coming in, and thy rage against me.
C: (29) Because thy rage against me, and thy tumult, is come up into mine ears,
B: therefore will I put my hook in thy nose, and my bridle in thy lips,
A: and I will turn thee back by the way by which thou camest.

In the ascending side of this chiasm the Lord attests that He is the creator of all things and raised up the Assyrian king to destroy. In the descending side the Lord minimizes the conquests of the king of Assyria when compared with His own works as Creator, then states that He will turn Sennacherib back by the way he came.

Verses 30 through 32 give a sign to the king of Assyria and to the people of Jerusalem. Verse 30 states: “And this shall be a sign unto thee, Ye shall eat this year such as groweth of itself; and the second year that which springeth of the same: and in the third year sow ye, and reap, and plant vineyards, and eat the fruit thereof.” The singular form, “thee,” directs that statement to the king of Assyria whereas the plural form, “ye,” directs the following statement to the people of Jerusalem.  The meaning is that for two years the land of Judah would remain fallow because of the conflict with Assyria and the danger of being outside the city’s protective walls, but in the third year the Jews would be able to work their lands, plant crops, and harvest them. Another dimension of this sign is as a type for the captivity of Judah in Babylon for three generations, after which a remnant would return.

This second meaning becomes clear in verses 31 and 32. Verse 31 commences: “And the remnant that is escaped of the house of Judah shall again take root downward, and bear fruit upward.” The prophecy is stated metaphorically, as a plant growing in soil.

Verse 32 continues: “For out of Jerusalem shall go forth a remnant, and they that escape out of mount Zion: the zeal of the LORD of hosts shall do this.” The Joseph Smith Translation renders “and they that escape out of Jerusalem shall come up upon mount Zion….”26 Recall an earlier sign, this one given to king Ahaz, that also described events to occur at a later time: “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.”27

Both of these signs proclaim that Jerusalem would survive her current difficulties, permitting the fulfillment of prophecy in the distant future. “Mount Zion” as used here means both the temple mount at Jerusalem28 and the place of latter-day spiritual gathering,29 thus indicating dual fulfillment of the prophecy, both anciently and in the latter days.

In verse 33 the Lord summarizes: “Therefore thus saith the LORD concerning the king of Assyria, He shall not come into this city, nor shoot an arrow there, nor come before it with shields, nor cast a bank against it.” Sennacherib would not be permitted to shoot even so much as an arrow against Jerusalem.

Verse 34 foretells Sennacherib’s departure: “By the way that he came, by the same shall he return, and shall not come into this city, saith the LORD.”

In verse 35, The Lord attests: “For I will defend this city to save it for mine own sake, and for my servant David’s sake.”30 “My servant David” means the current heir to the throne of David, the righteous king Hezekiah.31

Verse 36 describes the Lord’s intervention: “Then the angel of the LORD went forth, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians a hundred and fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses.” The Joseph Smith Translation renders “and when they who were left arose early in the morning….”32 No doubt the news of this singular event spread far, in fulfillment of Hezekiah’s plea before the Lord: “Now therefore, O LORD our God, save us from his hand, that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that thou art the LORD, even thou only.”33

This destruction of the Assyrian army foreshadows events in the latter days. By miraculous intervention, the Lord will stop a well-disciplined army at the periphery of the domain of His righteous people after that army will have devastated much of the surrounding regions. Earlier, in Chapter 14, Isaiah asserts:

The LORD of hosts hath sworn, saying, Surely as I have thought, so shall it come to pass; and as I have purposed, so shall it stand: That I will break the Assyrian in my land, and upon my mountains tread him under foot: then shall his yoke depart from off them, and his burden depart from off their shoulders.34

The Lord’s statement “upon my mountains” means the area surrounding Jerusalem in times of old, as well as being a prophetic type for the modern Zion in the mountains.35 In addition, it may be a type for Jerusalem in the latter days and events that will transpire there.

As Isaiah described in Chapter 28, the Lord will provide strength and courage for a small army of righteous Ephraimites who will turn back an invading army at the very gate of the city of Zion: “[A]nd for a spirit of judgment to him that sitteth in judgment, and for strength to them that turn the battle to the gate.”36

Verses 37 and 38 describe fulfillment of the prophecy regarding the death of the king of Assyria:

So Sennacherib king of Assyria departed, and went and returned, and dwelt at Nineveh.
And it came to pass, as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god, that Adrammelech and Sharezer his sons smote him with the sword; and they escaped into the land of Armenia: and Esar-haddon his son reigned in his stead.

Thus, Sennacherib was slain in the house of his god by his own sons, and Hezekiah and Jerusalem were defended by their God against strangers from a foreign land. The true God, worshiped by Hezekiah and his people, saved them by miraculously destroying the Assyrian army whereas Sennacherib, who blasphemously taunted that Jehovah would not be able to save Hezekiah and his people, was himself slain in the presence of his false god which was powerless to save him.

 


Notes:

1. See Isaiah 36 and pertinent commentary.
2. Isaiah 10:24-34.
3. See Isaiah 10 and pertinent commentary.
4. See Isaiah 36 and pertinent commentary.
5. Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary: 1988, Merriam-Webster Inc., Springfield, MA.
6. Donald W. Parry, Harmonizing Isaiah: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS) at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 2001, p. 149.
7. F. Brown, S. Driver, and C. Briggs, The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon: Hendrickson Publishers, Peabody, MA, 01961-3473, 1996, Strong’s No. 7307, p. 924.
8. Parry, 2001, p. 150.
9. Parry, 2001, p. 150.
10. Parry, 2001, p. 150.
11. Exodus 25:22.
12. Brown et al., 1996, Strong’s No. 2778, p. 357.
13. Parry, 2001, p. 151.
14. Parry, 2001, p. 151.
15. See 2 Kings 19:21, 31; Psalms 9:14; 51:18; Isaiah 10:32; 16:1; 52:2; 62:11.
16. Isaiah 10:32.
17. Isaiah 2:3; see pertinent commentary. See also Isaiah 10:12; 24:23; 31:9; 52:1, 2.
18. See Isaiah 9:18; 10:18-19, 33-34; 14:8; 29:17; 32:15; 55:12.
19. See Isaiah 2:12-13; 9:18; 10:18-19, 33-34; 14:8; 29:17; 32:15; 55:12.
20. See Isaiah 2:2, 14 and 2 Nephi 12:2, 14; Isaiah 11:9; 13:2, 4; 30:25 and pertinent commentary.
21. Joseph Fielding McConkie, Gospel Symbolism: Bookcraft, Inc. Salt Lake City, UT, pp. 129-130. See Isaiah 2:2, 14 and 2 Nephi 12:2, 14; Isaiah 11:9; 13:2, 4; 30:25 and pertinent commentary.
22. Verses 24 and 25 contain a chiasm: By the multitude of my chariots/height of the mountains/tall cedars thereof/ height of his border/with the sole of my feet.
23. Parry, 2001, p. 152.
24. Parry, 2001, p. 152.
25. Parry, 2001, p. 152.
26. Joseph Smith’s “New Translation” of the Bible: Herald Publishing House, Independence, Missouri, 1970, p. 206.
27. Isaiah 7:14.
28. See Psalms 9:11; 14:7; 74:2; 78:68-69; Isaiah 1:8; 4:3-4; 10:12, 32; 16:1; 18:7; 30:19; 31:4; 34:8; Doctrine and Covenants 133:18, 56.
29. See Psalms 102:13, 16; 129:5; 132:13; See Isaiah 3:16; 33:5, 14, 20; 34:8; 40:9; 41:27; 51:3.
30. Verses 32 through 35 contain a chiasm: The LORD of hosts shall do this/thus saith the LORD/shall not come into this city/by the way/by the same/ shall not come into this city/saith the LORD/ I will defend this city.
31. See Genesis 49:10; 1 Kings 2:33; 1 Samuel 15:27-28.
32. JST, 1970, p. 206.
33. Isaiah 37:20.
34. Isaiah 14:24-25.
35. See Isaiah 2:2; 37:24; and pertinent commentary.
36. Isaiah 28:6.

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