Most of Chapter 42 is a prophecy concerning the coming of Messiah—both His mortal ministry and His Second Coming. Verses 1 through 3 were quoted directly by the Lord Jesus Christ during His earthly ministry, as recorded by Matthew. As part of His ministry He would open the eyes of the blind, unstop the ears of the deaf and bring out the prisoners from the prison. The mortal Lord performed many healing miracles in which He restored sight and hearing—but these are symbolic of the greater spiritual miracle of the Lord’s mission, as attested in this chapter.

Freeing the prisoners is a fundamental part of the Atonement brought about by the Lord’s infinite sacrifice. Had He not provided the blessings of the resurrection to the entire human family vicariously by laying down His own life we would have been imprisoned forever, excluded from the presence of God and deprived of God’s greatest blessing of eternal progression.1 During the latter-day restoration, the Lord would direct the return of priesthood keys to the earth by ancient prophets. Priesthood keys are needed so that saving ordinances could be performed by proxy for the dead who did not receive such ordinances during their mortal lives. Thus the way to salvation would be opened for all; and prisoners, whether living or dead,2 would be brought out of prison.

Parts of Chapter 42 are synonymously parallel with parts of Chapter 41; comparison enables greater understanding.3 This chapter contains chiasms that are workable if wording from the Joseph Smith Translation (JST) is used.

This chapter begins with a statement from God the Father regarding the mission of His son, Jesus Christ. From the account we do not know whether the Father spoke directly to Isaiah; it is possible that the Lord Jehovah spoke using the words of His Father through the principle of divine investiture for the first 7 verses. Beginning in verse 8 the Lord Jehovah speaks, describing His own mission. Verses 1 through 3, quoted by the Lord Jesus Christ during His earthly ministry and recorded by Matthew, differ in significant detail when compared to their rendition in the Old Testament.4

In verses 1 through 9 God the Father proclaims Messiah to be His servant, foreshadowing Christ’s total obedience to His Father’s commandments. These verses are synonymously parallel with verses 8 through 10 of Chapter 41, in which Israel as a nation is proclaimed as the Lord’s servant. Verses 1 through 4 are also recognized as the first of four servant-songs in Isaiah’s writings.5

In a servant-song, characteristics of the Lord’s servant are presented as a psalm. As set forth by Isaiah in the four servant-songs Christ is the best exemplar of a servant, faithfully serving His Father and obeying Him in all things.6 Various prophets including Isaiah7 also fulfill criteria for a servant of the Lord.8 Others who exemplify Christ-like qualities as servants include the entire house of Israel;9 Joseph Smith, the great prophet of the restoration;10 the Latter-day Saints,11 and possibly others.

Verse 1 declares: “Behold my servant, whom I uphold; mine elect, in whom my soul delighteth; I have put my spirit upon him: he shall bring forth judgment to the Gentiles.” The Hebrew word translated as “Gentiles” means “nations.”12 The broader definition of “Gentiles” applies here—nations of the earth. Matthew renders, with differences shown in italics: “Behold my servant, whom I have chosen; my beloved, in whom my soul is well pleased: I will put my spirit upon him, and he shall shew judgment to the Gentiles.”13

The voice is that of God the Father proclaiming His son, Jesus Christ. “My servant” means that the Lord served the Eternal Father faithfully and obediently. “My beloved, in whom my soul is well pleased” reflects the words which the Father spoke to introduce His son on several occasions. Mark records:

…Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan.
And straightway coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens opened, and the Spirit like a dove descending upon him:
And there came a voice from heaven, saying, Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.
14

Three other instances are recorded in the scriptures in which the Father proclaimed and introduced His son using these or similar words. These events include the transfiguration on the high mountain,15 the appearance of the resurrected Lord to the Nephites on the American continent,16 and the first vision of Joseph Smith in the spring of 1820.17 God the Father is well pleased with His Son, who is beloved of Him; He is chosen and sustained of God and sent forth by Him to the nations of the earth. Other servants exhibiting Christ-like qualities fit these same criteria.

“Judgment,” as used in verse 1, means “social justice.”18 Other meanings for “judgment” found in the writings of Isaiah include fairness,19 retribution,20 sound reasoning,21 and an equitable system of laws.22

Verse 2 continues: “He shall not cry, nor lift up, nor cause his voice to be heard in the street.”

Matthew records: “He shall not strive, nor cry; neither shall any man hear his voice in the streets.”23 This means that Jesus Christ as servant would not be a seditionist or revolutionary, not inciting rebellion or violence. Other servants who fit Isaiah’s description would also shun strife and violence—an important key in identifying who speaks for God throughout the ages, and particularly in the latter days.

Verse 3 further declares: “A bruised reed shall he not break, and the smoking flax shall he not quench: he shall bring forth judgment unto truth.” Matthew renders: “A bruised reed shall he not break, and smoking flax shall he not quench, till he send forth judgment unto victory.”24 The meaning is that the Lord would not harm even the weak or vulnerable, reaffirming that He would not incite violence until after the time of His crucifixion and resurrection. This prophecy is another of several cited by writers in the New Testament as being fulfilled by events in the life of Jesus Christ.25 “Judgment,” as used here, means “sound reasoning.”26

Jesus quoted these three verses from Isaiah under circumstances that occurred early in His ministry. After performing miraculous healings and being followed by a multitude of people, He charged His followers and those whom He had healed not to talk openly about what they had witnessed. Matthew records:

Then the Pharisees went out, and held a council against him, how they might destroy him.
But when Jesus knew it, he withdrew himself from thence: and great multitudes followed him, and he healed them all;
And charged them that they should not make him known:
That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias [Isaiah] the prophet….27

Then Matthew quoted the first three verses of Isaiah 42.

Verse 4 continues the words of God the Father: “He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law.”28 The Father testifies that despite the most unfair treatment ever meted out, the most intense suffering ever suffered, and death by the most painful and ignominious method known, Jesus Christ would not fail in His saving mission nor be discouraged. “The isles shall wait for his law” may in part refer to the Nephites on the American continent, whom Christ visited following His crucifixion and resurrection. Nephi, quoting his brother Jacob, recorded that they were “upon an isle of the sea.”29 Other Christ-like servants would exhibit similar courage and perseverance in accomplishing duties assigned them by the Lord; many would lay down their lives to seal their testimonies.

In verse 5, the words of God the Father continue: “Thus saith God the LORD, he that created the heavens, and stretched them out; he that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it; he that giveth breath unto the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein.” He who speaks is the Creator of heaven and earth—He who gives life to the people on the earth, and the Father of the spirits of men.30

In verse 6, the Father speaks to His Son: “I the LORD have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles.” He who would send Messiah would hold His hand, protect Him, and give Him as a covenant for Israel and as a light to the Gentiles, or nations of the earth. Servants of the Lord who also fit Isaiah’s description would be called of God,31 protected and given inspiration as they testify to the nations of the earth.

The Lord clarifies in speaking to the Prophet Joseph Smith: “And even so I have sent mine everlasting covenant into the world, to be a light to the world, and to be a standard for my people, and for the Gentiles to seek to it, and to be a messenger before my face to prepare the way before me.”32

During Christ’s earthly ministry and shortly thereafter, the gospel was first given to the Jews33 and then to the Gentiles.34 Chiastically, the first part of the dispensation of the fulness of times is called “the fulness of the Gentiles,”35 after which the gospel will be given again to the Jews.36

The words of God the Father in verses 5 and 6 form a chiasm:

A: (5) Thus saith God the LORD, he that created the heavens, and stretched them out;
B: he that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it;
C: he that giveth breath unto the people upon it,
C: and spirit to them
B: that walk therein:
A: (6) I the LORD have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles;

The message of this chiasm is that God, the Creator of all, who gives breath and spirit to those who dwell on the earth, will sustain His only begotten Son during His earthly ministry.

Verse 7 states more of the mission of Messiah: “To open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison, and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house.” “To open the blind eyes” has a temporal and a spiritual meaning. Not only did the Lord miraculously restore sight to the blind;37 He delivered the truth to them that sat imprisoned in spiritual darkness. The major part of the Lord’s earthly ministry was spent teaching the truths of the gospel to the people He encountered, bringing them out of spiritual darkness—ignorance concerning the Plan of Salvation—into the light of truth. The Apostle Peter summarizes: “But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light” (emphasis added).38 Other servants would be called by the Lord and given power to bring light to those who are spiritually blind, and to provide the saving ordinances to those in spirit prison.

In introducing the doctrine of baptism for the dead to the membership of the church, the Prophet Joseph Smith stated: “…Let the dead speak forth anthems of eternal praise to the King Immanuel, who hath ordained, before the world was, that which would enable us to redeem them out of their prison; for the prisoners shall go free” (emphasis added).39

The Lord adds another dimension to the release of prisoners from bondage—the resurrection, which will occur among the righteous at the time of His Second Coming: “For as ye have looked upon the long absence of your spirits from your bodies to be a bondage, I will show unto you how the day of redemption shall come, and also the restoration of the scattered Israel.”40

In verse 8, the Lord Jehovah—the Son of the Eternal Father—speaks: “I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images.”41 The Lord identifies Himself as who is speaking. Chiastically, “The LORD” is antithetic to “graven images.” This statement parallels the Lord’s introduction to the Ten Commandments:

I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
Thou shalt have no other gods before me.
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image….42

He who spoke to Isaiah is He who gave the Ten Commandments to Moses.

Verses 6 through 8 contain a chiasm:

A: (6) I the LORD have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles;
B:  (7) To open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison,
B: and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house.
A:  (8) I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images.

“Prisoners from the prison” matches “prison house”—those who sit in darkness because of ignorance of the Plan of Salvation, imprisoned because of their lack of knowledge, will be set free by the Lord through the Atonement. Note that “the Lord” is the beginning point of this chiasm and also the end, symbolizing the reality that the Lord Jesus Christ is the beginning and the end as stated in many places in the scriptures.43 This pattern of chiastic structures beginning and ending with “the LORD” recurs frequently throughout the book of Isaiah.

In verse 9 the Lord continues describing His ministry: “Behold, the former things are come to pass, and new things do I declare: before they spring forth I tell you of them.” Paul amplifies: “Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.”44 The Law of Moses was fulfilled with the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ, who here foretells this change. The Lord, preaching to the Nephites on the American continent following His resurrection, clarifies: “Therefore those things which were of old time, which were under the law [of Moses], in me are all fulfilled. Old things are done away, and all things have become new.”45

Verses 10 through 13 are synonymously parallel to verses 11 through 16 of Chapter 41, which proclaim that Israel will be sustained by the Lord and will dominate her enemies.

Verses 10 through 12 comprise a song of salvation. It describes the praise to be offered to the resurrected Lord by the scattered of Israel—scattered from the end of the earth to the isles, the cities and villages of the wilderness, the rock, and the top of the mountains. Verse 10 begins: “Sing unto the LORD a new song, and his praise from the end of the earth, ye that go down to the sea, and all that is therein; the isles, and the inhabitants thereof.” “From the end of the earth” means “the greatest distance away.”46 As verse 10 alludes, part of the scattered of Israel inhabited the isles of the sea—those who went “down to the sea,” upon which they traveled by boat to a new land.47 Their account is presented in the Book of Mormon—the coming forth of which is described earlier by Isaiah, in Chapter 29.48

Verse 11 continues the praise: “Let the wilderness and the cities thereof lift up their voice, the villages that Kedar doth inhabit: let the inhabitants of the rock sing, let them shout from the top of the mountains.” “The top of the mountains,” which is cited by Isaiah in Chapter 2 as a gathering place for the righteous in the latter days,49 is the meaning of the name “Utah” in the Ute language.50 These locations are places where the scattered of Israel reside, at least some of which were visited by the resurrected Lord after His visitation to the Nephites.51 Kedar was a son of Ishmael.52

Verse 12 completes the song of salvation: “Let them give glory unto the LORD, and declare his praise in the islands.” 53 Again, “islands” refers to distant lands upon which the scattered of Israel dwell.54

The song of salvation of verses 10 through 12 is structured as a chiasm:

A: (10) Sing
B: unto the LORD a new song,
C: and his praise from the end of the earth,
D: ye that go down to the sea, and all that is therein;
E: the isles, and the inhabitants thereof.
F: (11) Let the wilderness and the cities thereof lift up their voice,
F: the villages that Kedar doth inhabit:
E: let the inhabitants of the rock sing,
D: let them shout from the top of the mountains.
C: (12) Let them give glory
B: unto the LORD,
A: and declare his praise in the islands.

The message of this chiasm is that the scattered children of Israel will, in the various places in which they have been dispersed, give praise to the Lord. “Sing” matches “declare his praise;” “ye that go down to the sea” complements “let them shout from the top of the mountains.” Lehi and his family went down to the sea, which they crossed to obtain the Promised Land of America where the place called “the top of the mountains” is located.

Verses 13 through 15 describe the Lord’s demeanor at His Second Coming, contrasting sharply with the description of His mortal ministry presented by God the Father in verses 1 through 4. At the time of His Second Coming no longer will He be still or hold His peace, but will go forth as a man of war to subdue His enemies. Verse 13 begins: “The LORD shall go forth as a mighty man, he shall stir up jealousy like a man of war: he shall cry, yea, roar; he shall prevail against his enemies.” “Jealousy” comes from a Hebrew word meaning “zeal” or “ardor.”55 Isaiah foretells this event in Chapter 31:

For thus hath the LORD spoken unto me, Like as the lion and the young lion roaring on his prey, when a multitude of shepherds is called forth against him, he will not be afraid of their voice, nor abase himself for the noise of them: so shall the LORD of hosts come down to fight for mount Zion, and for the hill thereof.56

Verses 14 through 17 are synonymously parallel with verses 17 through 20 of Chapter 41, which declare that the Lord will provide inspiration and revelation to the humble, will devastate Israel’s enemies, and will shame those who worship idols.

Verse 14 continues the themes begun in verse 13: “I have long time holden my peace; I have been still, and refrained myself: now will I cry like a travailing woman; I will destroy and devour at once.” No longer will the Lord be silent but will shout out loudly and destroy His enemies.

Verse 15 concludes: “I will make waste mountains and hills, and dry up all their herbs; and I will make the rivers islands, and I will dry up the pools.”57,58 “Mountains and hills” means nations large and small,59 and “rivers” means advancing armies.60 The wicked will be destroyed at His Second Coming, leaving entire nations of the wicked depopulated and their armies destroyed.

Verse 16 continues the Lord’s foretelling of His Second Coming, now describing His treatment of the meek: “And I will bring the blind by a way that they knew not; I will lead them in paths that they have not known: I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. These things will I do unto them, and not forsake them.”61 The “blind” means those in spiritual darkness because of wickedness and apostasy. The Lord will restore unto them the true knowledge of the path to salvation—the strait and narrow way, the true knowledge of which had been lost or corrupted.62 The spiritual darkness that had prevailed throughout the Dark Ages—beginning with the apostasy that ended the apostolic era—would be dispersed through the light of truth, restored by revelation from heaven.63 The crooked path, which resulted from corruption of the knowledge of the strait and narrow way, would again be made straight.64

Verse 16 contains a chiasm:

A:  (16) And I will bring
B: the blind by a way that they knew not;
C: I will lead them
D: in paths that they have not known:
E:   I will make darkness
E:   light before them,
D: and crooked things straight.
C: These things will I do
B: unto them,
A: and not forsake them.

The message of this chiasm is that the Lord will lead the spiritually blind by providing the light of inspiration to them, dispelling the spiritual darkness. “In paths that they have not known” is complemented by “crooked things straight.” This connection confirms that the strait and narrow path, which had become crooked through disobedience and apostasy, would be made straight again through divine revelation from the Lord.65

Verse 17 denounces idolaters: “They shall be turned back, they shall be greatly ashamed, that trust in graven images, that say to the molten images, Ye are our gods.” Idolatry is not only the worship of pagan gods; it is the worship of material goods, as described in Chapter 2 by Isaiah.66 Materialism would become the prevailing creed in the latter days before the Lord’s Second Coming; those whose belief centers in materialistic idolatry would be greatly ashamed.

Verse 18 proclaims the latter-day restoration: “Hear, ye deaf; and look, ye blind, that ye may see.” Those spiritually deaf and blind, having been deceived by false doctrines and corrupted by apostasy, would be given the opportunity to hear and see.

Verse 19 explains how these blind should see and these deaf be made to hear: “Who is blind, but my servant? or deaf, as my messenger that I sent? who is blind as he that is perfect, and blind as the LORD’s servant?” These words have been rendered as confusion due to “plain and precious things” having been taken away.67 Joseph Smith, who read through the Bible using the Urim and Thummim—the same divinely-prepared instrument that he used to translate the Book of Mormon from the reformed Egyptian—discerned the intended meaning, recorded in the Joseph Smith Translation:68

For I will send my servant unto you who are blind; yea, a messenger to open the eyes of the blind; yea, a messenger to open the eyes of the blind, and unstop the ears of the deaf;
And they shall be made perfect notwithstanding their blindness, if they will hearken unto the messenger, the Lord’s servant.
69

As established in verse 1 above, “servant” refers to the Lord Jesus Christ. Introduced first by God the Father, the Lord spoke to the young prophet, Joseph Smith, which began the great work of restoration in the latter days.70

Verse 20 describes the spiritual blindness and deafness of Israel: “Seeing many things, but thou observest not; opening the ears, but he heareth not.” JST renders, with differences shown in italics: “Thou art a people, seeing many things, but thou observest not; opening the ears to hear, but thou hearest not.”71 Israel is left blind and deaf to spiritual things because of her apostasy. As a type, this declaration also describes the Christian-era apostasy that characterized the period leading up to the latter-day restoration. Isaiah was forewarned of these periods of apostasy, writing his book of prophecy in code so that it would be plain to the reader endowed with the spirit of prophecy but incomprehensible to those not worthy of this great spiritual gift. The Lord instructed Isaiah: “Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.”72

Verse 18 and JST 19, 20 and 21 form a chiasm:

A: (18) Hear, ye deaf;
B: and look, ye blind, that ye may see.
C: (JST 19) For I will send my servant
D: unto you who are blind;
E: yea, a messenger to open the eyes of the blind,
E: and unstop the ears of the deaf;
D: (JST 20) And they shall be made perfect notwithstanding their blindness,
C: if they will hearken unto the messenger, the Lord’s servant.
B: (JST 21) Thou art a people, seeing many things, but thou observest not;
A: opening the ears to hear, but thou hearest not.

This chiasm centers on “yea, a messenger to open the eyes of the blind,” reflected by “and unstop the ears of the deaf,” as revealed in the Joseph Smith Translation of this passage. “Hear, ye deaf” contrasts with “opening the ears to hear, but thou hearest not;” “look, ye blind, that ye may see” contrasts with “seeing many things, but thou observest not;” and “my servant” matches “the Lord’s servant,” identifying that God the Father is speaking. Deafness and blindness as used here refer to spiritual rather than physical deficiencies. This chiasm is workable if words provided by the Joseph Smith Translation, shown in italics, are used.

Verse 21 states: “The LORD is well pleased for his righteousness’ sake; he will magnify the law, and make it honourable.” JST renders the verse as a condemnation of apostasy, with differences shown in italics: “The LORD is not well pleased with such a people, but for his righteousness’ sake; he will magnify the law, and make it honourable.”73 The Law of Moses had been dishonored because of Israel’s apostasy. Nevertheless, the Lord would make it honorable again during His earthly ministry by fulfilling it. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus proclaimed:

Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets; I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill.
For verily I say unto you, Heaven and earth must pass away, but one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, until all be fulfilled.
74

Verse 22 describes the results of Israel’s apostasy: “But this is a people robbed and spoiled; they are all of them snared in holes, and they are hid in prison houses: they are for a prey, and none delivereth; for a spoil, and none saith, Restore.” JST amplifies, with differences shown in italics: “Thou art a people robbed and spoiled; thine enemies, all of them, have snared thee in holes, and they have hid thee in prison houses: they have taken thee for a prey, and none delivereth; for a spoil, and none saith, Restore.”75

Verse 23 describes the conditions under which restoration would come about: “Who among you will give ear to this? who will hearken and hear for the time to come?” JST renders: “Who among them will give ear unto thee, or hearken and hear thee for the time to come?”76 Giving heed to the words of the Lord, and to prophecies regarding the future, would prepare the people for the blessings of restoration.

Verse 24 delineates the cause of Israel’s woes: “Who gave Jacob for a spoil, and Israel to the robbers? did not the LORD, he against whom we have sinned? for they would not walk in his ways, neither were they obedient unto his law.” Isaiah poses a rhetorical question then answers it with another, establishing that the Lord yielded up Israel to her enemies because of iniquity. Finally, he states that it was failure to receive the ordinances of salvation and to obey the law of the Lord that caused the kingdom of Israel to be carried away captive.77

Verse 25 further explains: “Therefore he hath poured upon him the fury of his anger, and the strength of battle: and it hath set him on fire round about, yet he knew not; and it burned him, yet he laid it not to heart.” JST renders: “Therefore he hath poured upon them the fury of his anger, and the strength of battle: and they have set them on fire round about, yet they know not; and it burned them, yet they laid it not to heart.”78 This prophecy alludes to the burnings that would take place at the Second Coming.79 Israel has been the recipient of the Lord’s anger, manifest as the ravages of battle and devastating fire. Despite these chastisements Jacob fails to understand, or take to heart, the underlying reasons for the Lord’s punishment.

JST verse 22, JST verse 23, and verses 23 through 25 form a chiasm:

A: (JST 22) The LORD is not well pleased with such a people, but for his righteousness’ sake;
B: he will magnify the law, and make it honourable.
C: (JST 23) Thou art a people robbed
D: and spoiled; thine enemies, all of them, have snared thee in holes, and they have hid thee in prison houses: they have taken thee for a prey, and none delivereth; for a spoil, and none saith, Restore.
E: (23) Who among you will give ear to this?
E: who will hearken and hear for the time to come?
D: (24) Who gave Jacob for a spoil,
C: and Israel to the robbers?
B: did not the LORD, he against whom we have sinned? for they would not walk in his ways, neither were they obedient unto his law.
A: (25) Therefore he hath poured upon them the fury of his anger, and the strength of battle: and it hath set them on fire round about, yet they know not; and it burned them, yet they laid it not to heart.

The elements of this chiasm are also apparent in the King James Version, but their meanings are less clear. “Who among you will give ear to this?” and its reflection “who will hearken and hear for the time to come?” describe the conditions under which the gathering of Israel will begin to take place. The ascending side of the chiasm describes the effect of failure of the house of Israel to “give ear” and “hearken and hear,” whereas the cause for their tribulations is delineated in the descending side.

 


Notes:

1. See Mosiah 16:6-8.
2. See Doctrine and Covenants 110:13-16.
3. Victor L. Ludlow, Isaiah: Prophet, Seer, and Poet: Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1982, p. 349-356.
4. See Matthew 12:18-20.
5. Ludlow, 1982, p. 358-360. The four servant-songs are in Isaiah 42:1-4, 49:1-6; 50:4-9 and 52:13 through 53:12.
6. See John 6:38.
7. See Isaiah 49:5; Amos 3:7; Revelation 10:7.
8. Ludlow, 1982, p. 358-360.
9. See Isaiah 41:8-10 and pertinent commentary.
10. See Doctrine and Covenants 1:17, 29; 19:13; 28:2; 35:17-18.
11. See Doctrine and Covenants 1:6; 42:63; 44:1; 68:5-6; 133:30, 32.
12. F. Brown, S. Driver, and C. Briggs, The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon: Hendrickson Publishers, Peabody, MA, 01961-3473, 1996, Strong’s No. 1471, p. 156.
13. Matthew 12:18.
14. Mark 1:9-11. See also Matthew 3:17; Luke 3:21-22.
15. Matthew 17:1-5.
16. 3 Nephi 11:7.
17. Joseph Smith—History 1:17.
18. See Isaiah 5:7; 28:6; 59:8, 15.
19. See Isaiah 1:21; 30:18; 32:1; 33:5; 41:1; 49:4; 53:8.
20. See Isaiah 1:17; 3:14; 4:4; 34:5.
21. See Isaiah 1:17; 28:7; 40:14, 27; 42:3; 59:8.
22. See Isaiah 51:4; 54:17.
23. Matthew 12:19.
24. Matthew 12:20.
25. See Matthew 12:17; see also Isaiah 6:10, pertinent commentary and endnote.
26. See Isaiah 1:17; 28:7; 40:14, 27; 59:8.
27. Matthew 12:14-17.
28. Verse 4 contains a chiasm recognized in the original Hebrew: Set/earth/judgment/his law/isles/wait. In Donald W. Parry, Harmonizing Isaiah: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS) at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 2001, p. 262.
29. See 2 Nephi 10:20; see also Isaiah 24:15; 42:10-12; 49:1; 51:5; 60:6, 9 and pertinent commentary.
30. See Isaiah 40:28; 41:20; 44:24; 45:12; Moses 1:33; 4:2.
31. See Article of Faith 5; Hebrews 5:4.
32. Doctrine and Covenants 45:9.
33. See Matthew 10:6; 15:24.
34. See Acts 10:9-48.
35. See Romans 11:25.
36. See 1 Nephi 13:42. See also Matthew 19:30; 20:16; Mark 10:31; Jacob 5:63; Ether 13:12; Doctrine and Covenants 29:30.
37. See Matthew 11:4-6; Psalms 146:8.
38. 1 Peter 2:9.
39. Doctrine and Covenants 128:22. See also Isaiah 24:22; 49:9; 61:1; Hebrews 11:40; 1 Peter 3:18-20; Doctrine and Covenants 76:73-74; 138:11-34.
40. Doctrine and Covenants 45:17.
41. Verse 8 contains a chiasm: I am the LORD/my glory/will I not give/neither/my praise/to graven images.
42. Exodus 20:2-4.
43. See Revelation 21:6; 22:13; Isaiah 46:10; Hebrews 7:3; Alma 11:39; 13:7-8; 3 Nephi 9:18; Doctrine and Covenants 19:1; 29:33; 35:1, 38:1; 45:7; 49:12; 54:1; 61:1; 78:16; 84:17, 120; 95:7; Moses 1:3; 2:1; 6:7, 67; Abraham 2:8.
44. 2 Corinthians 5:17.
45. 3 Nephi 12:46.
46. See Isaiah 40:28; 41:5, 9; 43:6.
47. See 1 Nephi chapters 17 and 18. See 2 Nephi 10:20; see also Isaiah 24:15; 42:4; 49:1; 51:5; 60:6, 9 and pertinent commentary.
48. See Isaiah 29:11-14.
49. See Isaiah 2:2, 14 and 2 Nephi 12:2, 14; Isaiah 11:9; 13:2, 4; 30:25 and pertinent commentary.
50. See Isaiah 2:2 and pertinent commentary. See also McConkie, Joseph Fielding, Gospel Symbolism: Bookcraft, Inc. Salt Lake City, UT, pp. 129-130, and “The Mountain of the Lord” (videotape), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1993.
51. See 3 Nephi 15:15-24 and 3 Nephi 16:1-3.
52. See Genesis 25:13.
53. Verse 12 contains a chiasm recognized in the original Hebrew: Give glory/unto the LORD/his praise/declare. Parry, 2001, p. 262.
54. See Isaiah 11:11; 24:15; 42:4, 10-12; 49:1; 51:5; 60:9 and pertinent commentary. See also 1 Nephi 19:10, 12, 16; 22:4;  2 Nephi 10:21; 29:7, 11; Doctrine and Covenants 1:1.
55. Brown, et al., 1996, Strong’s No. 7068, p. 888.
56. Isaiah 31:4.
57. Verses 13 through 15 contain a chiasm: The LORD shall go forth as a mighty man/stir up jealousy/cry, yea, roar/ I have long time/holden my peace/I have been still/now will I/cry/destroy and devour/I will make waste.
58. Verse 15 contains a chiasm recognized in the original Hebrew: Make waste/mountains and hills/herbs/dry up. Parry, 2001, p. 262.
59. See Isaiah 2:2, 14 and 2 Nephi 12:2, 14; Isaiah 11:9; 13:2, 4; 30:25 and pertinent commentary.
60. See Isaiah 8:7; 18:1, 7; 43:12 and pertinent commentary.
61. Verses 15 and 16 contain a chiasm: I will/mountains and hills/dry up/rivers/islands/dry up/pools/I will.
62. See Isaiah 26:7-8; 28:7; 40:3; 43:16, 19 and pertinent commentary.
63. See Isaiah 9:2; 2 Nephi 3:5; Doctrine and Covenants 95:6.
64. See Isaiah 40:4 and pertinent commentary.
65. See Isaiah 40:4 and pertinent commentary.
66. See Isaiah 2:7-8 and pertinent commentary.
67. See 1 Nephi 13:28.
68. Gordon B. Hinckley, Our Heritage: a brief history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: Published by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1996, p. 24. See JST Isaiah 42:19-23.
69. Joseph Smith’s “New Translation” of the Bible: Herald Publishing House, Independence, Missouri, 1970, p. 207.
70. See Joseph Smith—History 1:17-20.
71. JST, 1970, p. 207.
72. Isaiah 6:9-10.
73. JST, 1970, p. 207.
74. Matthew 5:17-18.
75. JST, 1970, p. 208.
76. JST, 1970, p. 208.
77. See 2 Kings 17:6-8; Isaiah 7:8; 8:4; 17:2; 43:6; 49:12; 54:7.
78. JST, 1970, p. 208.
79. See Isaiah 1:7, 28; 30:27, 30, 33; 33:11-12 and pertinent commentary.

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